Voices of Cancer

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Read April 5, 2017

What Can a Little Cancer Support Lead To?

When I was 46-year-old, as a single father of my son Joel, who is 13, I tried to go to a Boy Scout camp that required a medical release form. But my doctor insisted on doing a physical before signing it. Because of this, a life-saving PSA test was given. A PSA of 19 led to a biopsy, which discovered a Gleason score of 9, and I had to tell my son that I had prostate cancer.
CSC Frankly Speaking About Cancer: Clinical Trials
Read July 20, 2016

Cancer Clinical Trials: The Search for Hope

This week's blog post features the story of two patients, Elisa and Bill. Elisa and Bill represent the people facing cancer who actively seek information about the treatments available for their cancer, who work as partners with their doctors and health care teams to make the best decisions about their care. They both made choices that involved dislocation, uncertainty and loss. They made these choices because the clinical trial represented something more important. They chose hope--hope for longer, better lives.
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Listen June 21, 2016

Fact plus Fiction = Truth

The book "Alice and Oliver" is raw, jarring, intense, emotional, exhausting—everything that people experience when they receive a cancer diagnosis. Although this book is a...
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Listen April 12, 2016

Encore: Be Here Now

Be Here Now is a raw and intimate documentary film currently in production which chronicles the cancer journey of actor Andy Whitfield and his wife...
Read November 15, 2013

I’m not SHOUTING – I just want my voice to be heard

You’re used to making decisions. You multi-task while leading others in your job. Suddenly, you’re being told the decisions; you’re excruciatingly tired and weak; you can barely decide what to have for dinner. That was how I felt after my Chronic Myeloid Leukemia (CML) diagnosis in May 2009. And through countless rounds of blood work, doctors’ office waits, cardiograms, scans and the dreaded bone marrow biopsy, the system-focused health care system soon taught me that sometimes, in order for MY voice to be heard, it had to sound loud and confident. The first year, I was sick with the side effects of my first cancer treatment and from the leukemia itself because the medication didn’t work for me. That year, I didn’t have the energy to make myself heard so just blindly did what I was told. Take this every day, do that, be here at 2 pm, don’t eat grapefruit, wait here, turn on your side, come back in three months. This series of short commands ruled my life. Then somehow, in that fog, I started questioning the commands. That was the first inkling of my voice coming back. Soon after that, we switched to another medicine for my CML treatment.