Skip to main content
 

How Precise is Precision Medicine?

Wednesday, October 10, 2018

While government officials and the medical community celebrate advances in precision medicine, patients often struggle to navigate a treatment landscape that increasingly resembles science fiction.

The Importance of Understanding Psychosocial Concerns in Cancer Survivorship

Friday, October 5, 2018

While clear advances have certainly been made in treatment and survival, there remains a critical need to better understand the quality of life implications of survivorship. We applaud the multidisciplinary approach of cancer care, and also advocate strongly for an even more comprehensive view of treating patients, above and beyond the treatment of their disease.

Amplifying the Patient Voice in Cancer Care

Friday, September 28, 2018

In cancer care, goals should be informed by what the patient considers to be most important. This is why our team at the Research and Training Institute is developing a new tool that can be used to measure what really matters to patients- Valued Outcomes in the Cancer Experience (VOICE™).

New Research on Eating and Nutrition Released at ASCO 2018

Tuesday, June 5, 2018

Today is the final day of the American Society of Clinical Oncology’s annual conference, which is the largest gathering of oncology professionals from around the world.

Throughout the conference, we’ve posted blogs sharing our latest research on gastric cancer and melanoma. Today’s blog is a short post covering our research on patient-clinician communication about eating and nutrition.

New Research on Melanoma Survivors Released at ASCO 2018

Monday, June 4, 2018

Last Friday, you may have seen a post on our blog explaining that we will be sharing three Q-and-A blogs sharing the significance of our latest research abstracts at the American Society of Oncology’s annual conference that will greatly impact people affected by cancer.

Today’s blog covers our latest research on communication between melanoma patients and their health care team.

Below see our second Q-and-A with our President, Linda House, on the topic.

The Cancer Support Community Releases Research at ASCO

Friday, June 1, 2018

From today through June 5, we will be at the largest gathering of oncology professionals from around the world in Chicago, Illinois.

The American Society of Clinical Oncology’s annual conference is a fantastic opportunity for us to share three exciting new research abstracts that will greatly impact people affected by cancer.

Throughout the conference, we will post a series of short Q-and-A blogs explaining the significance of our findings. Today’s blog covers our latest research on communication between gastric cancer patients and their health care team.

Demystifying Distress Screening

Monday, March 26, 2018

Whether you are familiar with the phrase distress screening or are seeing it for the first time, the results we are sharing will show how important this tool is for patients diagnosed with cancer.

Low Cost, High Reward: A Stepped Care Program for Psychological Distress

Monday, March 5, 2018

Financial considerations may hinder the use of psychosocial care among cancer patients. Indeed, research has debated the extent to which patients are willing to pay for the costs associated with successful psychosocial interventions. A recent article in the Journal of Clinical Oncology, however, suggests that cost-effective programs are not only attainable, but that they also have promising implications for the well-being of distressed cancer patients.

How to overcome sleepless nights after cancer

Wednesday, February 8, 2017

How often do you feel pressure to get a good night’s sleep? We often read news headlines about the health effects of sleep deprivation (perhaps at 3 a.m. when we can’t sleep). For some, feeling like we need “enough” sleep can become internalized and take on a life of its own in our thoughts. This, in turn, certainly does not help induce sleep.

Worry about sleep affects a huge segment of the population, particularly those who have been diagnosed with cancer. While problems sleeping are certainly not unique to those with cancer, the prevalence of insomnia among those diagnosed is estimated at between 30-60% at some point during or after treatment.

Experiences of Melanoma Patients and Caregivers

Wednesday, December 14, 2016

The Cancer Support Community constantly strives to better understand the experiences of patients and caregivers to best meet their needs. Often we conduct in-depth surveys on specific concerns or cancer diagnoses when we are considering adding or modifying programs. This past spring, we conducted such a survey of individuals (both patients and caregivers) affected by melanoma. We, along with partner organizations, conducted an online survey of 140 individuals diagnosed with melanoma and 64 caregivers assessing experiences, beliefs, attitudes, preferences for information and support.

Pages

Authors