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Leukemia

Leukemia is cancer of the blood cells. It forms in tissue such as bone marrow and causes blood cells to be produced and enter the bloodstream. It usually starts in white blood cells, which are strong infection fighters. The blood cells grow and divide abnormally, producing large numbers of white blood cells that do not function properly.

Lymphoma

Lymphoma is a type of blood cancer that develop in the lymph nodes and tissues of the lymphatic system, an important part of the body’s immune system. Lymphomas begin in the white blood cells (lymphocytes) and affect the body’s ability to fight infection. Bone marrow makes red blood cells, blood platelets, and white blood cells. Lymphomas sometimes start from bone marrow lymphocytes.

Multiple Meyeloma

Myeloma is a cancer of the plasma cells, a type of white blood cell that develops in the bone marrow. Plasma cells make antibodies and help the immune system fight off infection and disease. In people with multiple myeloma, the plasma cells become abnormal and produce a protein called an M protein. When these abnormal plasma cells multiply, they can create bone lesions tumors that can cause damage to the bones and lead to pain.

Myeloproliferative Neoplasms (MPNs)

Myeloproliferative Neoplasms (MPNs) are blood cancers that occur when the body makes too many white or red blood cells, or platelets. This overproduction of blood cells in the bone marrow can create problems for blood flow and lead to various symptoms.