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Tan Expectations

Wednesday, July 10, 2013

Today the threat of skin cancer does not usually cross young peoples’ minds when they grab their towels and skip the sunscreen to lie out in the sun to get bronze skin. It is normal and very common to bring up in conversation one’s tan, and it is a compliment to hear, “Wow, you look so dark!” As a college student, I know that a nice tan is an expectation of young people during the summer months.

The media and pop culture often glamorize tan skin, encouraging young people to attain a luminous glow. However, skin cancer is a very real danger to my generation. The most aggressive form of skin cancer is melanoma. It develops when skin cells are damaged and mutate, which causes rapid skin cell growth. It is usually pigmented (typically brown or black) and can be seen on the skin. It is estimated that in 2013, 76,690 new cases of invasive melanoma will be diagnosed. Melanoma is also the most common form of cancer in young adults ages 25-29.

A focused fact finding mission: The Cancer Experience Registry

Saturday, July 6, 2013

The launch of the Cancer Support Community’s Multiple Myeloma Cancer Experience Registry is a huge step forward for all of us that have been afflicted with MM.

Thank you! Thank you! CSC and the entire team that has spent months of time developing this registry on our behalf!

Young Leaders Host Comedy Night to Benefit CS

Wednesday, June 26, 2013

We seem to have a history of hosting Comedy Night on the rainiest day of the summer. Yet again, on Thursday, June 13, 2013, it was a torrential downpour outside as the Young Leadership Council’s friends and family made their way to Greenwich Village Comedy Club. Fortunately, no amount of rain could stop this crowd. In fact, our friends were looking for tickets to the event up until show time, a true testament to the importance of our mission and the inescapable passion of the YLC. As the lights dimmed and we settled in to enjoy a night of laughs (and a surprise visit by Judah Friedlander!), Gilda Radner crossed all of our minds.

The Cancer Support Launches its Cancer Policy Institute

Wednesday, June 19, 2013

Today was a very special day for the Cancer Support Community as we launched the Cancer Policy Institute, an initiative that furthers our organization’s mission to ensure that all people impacted by cancer are empowered by knowledge, strengthened by action and sustained by community.

We are excited to take this next step by advocating on behalf of all people impacted by cancer so that the voices of 13.7 million cancer survivors and their families are heard on Capitol Hill and in state and local legislatures across the country. The Cancer Policy Institute will work to move the agenda that comprehensive, quality cancer care integrates medical care and social and emotional care.

Can We Chat?

Monday, June 10, 2013

Need a local referral for a wig? Have questions to ask your health care team but just can’t seem to get the questions organized? Feeling helpless and overwhelmed by the recent diagnosis of a loved one? Want to find a local Cancer Support Community? Live Chat at the Cancer Support Helpline may be just what you need. The Cancer Support Helpline has just added an easy to use new feature that will get you connected to the help you need.

Where Do People Get Support?

Friday, June 7, 2013

As a social worker on an inpatient unit of a New York City hospital, I am reminded, on a daily basis, of just how important psychosocial support is in the lives of individuals affected by illness. Although many of my patients are fortunate to have wonderful support networks, equally as many (if not more) of my patients have very limited family/friend support. Sometimes, I even come across patients who state they do not have anyone to list as their emergency contact person. My role as the unit’s social worker is to help my patients and their families cope with and understand the various medical, psychological, and social issues related to their illness. I work with the patients, their families/friends, and the medical team to determine a safe, appropriate discharge plan. For those patients with limited or no family/friend support, I try my best to make them feel that they are not alone during their hospitalization. However, I do not continue to follow my patients once they leave the hospital. Upon discharge, patients are set up with medical follow up appointments and are referred for home care or rehabilitation, if necessary. But, where will they turn for psychosocial support?

Working Together to Make Sure No One Faces Cancer Alone

Monday, May 20, 2013

The Breakaway from Cancer partnership is all about working together as a team to help people find the vital resources they need before, during and after their cancer journey. Over the past week, the Cancer Support Community, the Prevent Cancer Foundation, the Patient Advocate Foundation and the National Coalition for Cancer Survivorship have been traveling up the coast of California following America’s biggest professional cycling race, The Amgen Tour of California.

With the help of our California Cancer Support Community affiliates this week, we’ve connected tons of people to local and national resources that can help them through the cancer experience.

Cyclists Turn Up the Heat in Southern California

Monday, May 13, 2013

It’s been a hot first couple of days in southern California, and I’m not just talking about the weather! The Amgen Tour of California kicked off Sunday in Escondido, a city just north of San Diego. Professional cyclist Lieuwe Westra of Team Vacansoleil-DCM took first place at Stage 1, on a complex 102.6 mile course on a day where temperatures hit 104 degrees Fahrenheit. Stage 2 ended atop picturesque Mount San Jacinto in Palm Springs, at a challenging altitude of 9,790 feet. Janier Acevedo of Team Jamis-Hagens Berman took first place on that round today.

Gearing up for the 2013 Amgen Tour of California

Tuesday, April 30, 2013

Breakaway from Cancer is a national initiative to increase awareness of important resources available to people affected by cancer—from prevention through survivorship. Founded in 2005, it is a partnership between Amgen and four cancer-related nonprofits: Cancer Support

Making a difference for others with cancer

Thursday, March 21, 2013

A diagnosis of cancer can be devastating and a journey that is unclear to those moving through it. Yet patients who have faced cancer are more than willing to share information about their experience perhaps with the hope that their learning can make it easier for people who are newly diagnosed. Today, the Research and Training Institute of the Cancer Support Community launched a first-of-its-kind Cancer Experience Registry which aims to understand the many facets of the cancer experience through the eyes of those who have experienced it first-hand.

Anyone touched by cancer can join the registry to share their experience, compare their responses to others who have joined and explore resources available to them.

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