Targeted Therapy for Ovarian Cancer

Targeted therapy “targets” a specific change in some cancers that help them grow, divide, and spread. Doctors decide to use it based on the findings of biomarker tests.  

Keep in mind that you may not get any or even most of the possible side effects of a drug. Be sure to tell your health care team about the side effects you do have.

These are the targeted therapy drugs for ovarian cancer that have been approved as of July 2021. New treatments become available all the time, so this may not be a complete list. 

Search by Drug Name

Treatment Type

Angiogenesis Inhibitor

Drug Names
Avastin® (Bevacizumab) and its biosimilars:
Mvasi® (bevacizumab-awwb)
Zirabev™ (bevacizumab-bvzr)
Important Things to Know
  • This targeted therapy blocks the growth of the blood vessels tumors need to thrive.
  • There is the risk of developing an upper respiratory infection or difficulty breathing.
  • Kidney problems are a possible side effect.
  • A low white blood cell count is a potential side effect that may put you at risk for anemia, infection, or bleeding.             

Treatment Type

PARP (poly[ADP]-ribose polymerase) Inhibitors

Drug Names
Lynparza® (Olaparib)
Rubraca® (Rucaparib)
Zejula® (Niraparib)
Important Things to Know
  • This targeted therapy may help keep cancer cells from repairing their damaged DNA, causing them to die.
  • This therapy is for HER2-/BRCA+ cancer.
  • These drugs may interact with other drugs. Tell your doctor about everything else you are taking.
  • Avoid grapefruit and grapefruit juice while taking.  
  • Low blood counts are a potential side effect that may put you at risk for anemia, infection, or bleeding.