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Be the Boss Over Cancer

Wednesday, April 8, 2015

Hello! I’m Kelsey Fenton, Associate Manager of Programs at Cancer and Careers, a national non-profit organization that empowers and educates people with cancer to thrive in their workplace, and a long-time partner of CSC.

Upon receiving a cancer diagnosis, you might be overwhelmed not only with treatment decisions, finding support and financial stress (in which CSC provides a number of great resources) but also employment challenges. Whether you are deciding if you should take time off for treatment, are looking for work after treatment or trying to figure out how to manage working through treatment, there is a lot of information that you need to gather – from various sources.

At Cancer and Careers, we provide a variety of programs and information in person, print and online to help you gather such information and navigate the practical and legal challenges of balancing work and cancer.

What I’ve Learned from Watching “Cancer: The Emperor of All Maladies”

Wednesday, April 1, 2015

When I first started watching the PBS documentary Cancer: The Emperor of All Maladies on Monday night I wasn’t sure I agreed with calling cancer an emperor. It seemed to be such a positive and powerful term to place on something with such a negative impact. But after two nights of tuning in and live tweeting, and as I get ready for the third, I get it. Cancer is a disease like no other, even within itself it never seems to be the same way twice—it’s smarter than that. Giving a powerful disease a powerful name pays respect to the millions of people who take on “The Emperor” every year–a respect greatly earned by all who are affected.

But that isn’t the only thing that struck me while watching the first two nights of the film.

What We Can Learn from Angelina Jolie Pitt

Wednesday, March 25, 2015

Yesterday, Angelina Jolie Pitt made headlines when she revealed her decision to surgically remove her ovaries and fallopian tubes, due to an estimated 50% risk that she would develop ovarian cancer. The risk stems from a hereditary mutated gene, the BRCA1, which not only affected Jolie’s ovaries, but gave her an 87% chance of developing breast cancer as well (before her double mastectomy in 2013).

We sometimes forget that even celebrities face challenges which can make them feel lost and without control, but the emotional effects of cancer are universal. People say cancer doesn’t discriminate, but that’s not true; cancer is an unfair disease which affects the population unequally, and the sad truth is that some of us are more at risk for certain cancers based on our genetic backgrounds than others. But just because you carry a gene doesn’t mean that you don’t have options.

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