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What Is the Link Between Obesity and Colorectal Cancer?

Tuesday, July 30, 2019

The adverse effects of obesity include conditions like type II diabetes, hypertension, and cardiovascular disease. However, obesity has also been linked to the development of certain types of cancer, including colorectal cancer.

Three Questions & Answers About Cancer Treatment During Pregnancy

Thursday, March 28, 2019

While a cancer diagnosis during pregnancy is rare, it does occur. Read our short Q-and-A on what to know about treatment during pregnancy.

Increasing Breast Cancer Awareness Among Asian-American Women

Wednesday, October 17, 2018

Like many women in communities of color, Asian-Americans face disproportionate health outcomes. Many Asian-American women lack important education about breast cancer symptoms, which can lead to later diagnoses and worse health outcomes.

Four Things You Need to Know About Kidney Cancer

Thursday, March 1, 2018

March is a busy month for cancer awareness. In addition to Colorectal Cancer and Multiple Myeloma Awareness Month, it’s also Kidney Cancer Awareness Month.

We’ve compiled a short list of four things you need to know about kidney cancer for information, knowledge, and support during Kidney Cancer Awareness Month.

Where Do People Get Support?

Friday, June 7, 2013

As a social worker on an inpatient unit of a New York City hospital, I am reminded, on a daily basis, of just how important psychosocial support is in the lives of individuals affected by illness. Although many of my patients are fortunate to have wonderful support networks, equally as many (if not more) of my patients have very limited family/friend support. Sometimes, I even come across patients who state they do not have anyone to list as their emergency contact person. My role as the unit’s social worker is to help my patients and their families cope with and understand the various medical, psychological, and social issues related to their illness. I work with the patients, their families/friends, and the medical team to determine a safe, appropriate discharge plan. For those patients with limited or no family/friend support, I try my best to make them feel that they are not alone during their hospitalization. However, I do not continue to follow my patients once they leave the hospital. Upon discharge, patients are set up with medical follow up appointments and are referred for home care or rehabilitation, if necessary. But, where will they turn for psychosocial support?

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