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Seven Tips to Manage Scanxiety

Thursday, January 11, 2018

There’s no getting around it: cancer is a waiting game. Whether it’s for test results, a loved one’s upcoming scan, or your five-year checkup after treatment is complete, waiting can be one of the most stressful aspects of living with cancer.

If you find yourself feeling anxious as the next scan approaches, you’re not alone. In fact, this normal worry is so common that the cancer community gave it a nickname: “scanxiety.” There’s no one-size-fits-all solution, but trying even one or two of these self-care tips can make scanxiety easier to live with.

American Health Care Act Changes in Advance of Vote

Tuesday, March 21, 2017

Last night (March 20), House Republicans introduced amendments to their health care reform legislation the American Health Care Act. Check out our blog to find out details and sign up to be a grassroots advocate.

President Trump’s Budget Significantly Reduces Funding for Cancer Research

Friday, March 17, 2017

President Trump released his proposed budget, “America First: A Budget Blueprint to Make America Great Again” on Wednesday, March 15. It includes significant funding cuts, including a near 20% reduction to the Department of Health and Human Services and National Institutes of Health including the National Cancer Institute.

Replacing the Affordable Care Act: What You Need to Know

Tuesday, March 7, 2017

The American Health Care Act was introduced in the U.S. House of Representatives on March 6, 2017. As this bill, and other proposals are considered, it is important for cancer patients, survivors, and their loved ones to understand the potential implications of these changes.

For All The Caregivers

Wednesday, November 16, 2016

In 2015, President Barack Obama proclaimed November National Family Caregivers Month to recognize the hard work and dedication of all the selfless caregivers around the country. At the Cancer Support Community, we understand that caregivers are an essential part of the cancer care team from the start. Caregivers can be spouses, partners, children, relatives or friends who help, care and support those living with cancer.

Defining Self-Advocacy

Wednesday, September 7, 2016

What does it mean to be a self-advocate? When we think of an advocate, we generally think of someone who is publicly supporting some policy or cause. So, how can you be an advocate for yourself? This week’s blog post kicks off a series of posts about how to become a self-advocate. Learn more about what self-advocacy means and find out how you can begin to advocate for yourself.

Cancer Clinical Trials: The Search for Hope

Wednesday, July 20, 2016

This week's blog post features the story of two patients, Elisa and Bill. Elisa and Bill represent the people facing cancer who actively seek information about the treatments available for their cancer, who work as partners with their doctors and health care teams to make the best decisions about their care. They both made choices that involved dislocation, uncertainty and loss. They made these choices because the clinical trial represented something more important. They chose hope--hope for longer, better lives.

Cancer Clinical Trials: Getting Beyond the Myths

Wednesday, June 22, 2016

Right now, we are in an era of remarkable progress in understanding why and how cancers start and grow. Researchers are developing many new ways to treat cancers. In the last 10 years, targeted therapies and immunotherapy have opened the doors to real hope for longer, better lives--even cures--for people whose cancers could not be treated successfully.

Cancer and Aging: The Connection Between Two Life-Changing Events

Wednesday, June 15, 2016

This week's blog post is an excerpt from last month's Cancer Experience Registry newsletter. This excerpt is from an interview with Jimmie Holland, MD, Wayne E. Chapmen Chair of Psychiatric Oncology at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, and Dayle Friedman, Rabbi, Spiritual Consultant and Trainer at Growing Older: Wisdom + Spirit Beyond Midlife. This newsletter focused on the topic of cancer and aging.

Hope: What Motivates Us to Go Forward

Wednesday, May 11, 2016

"By definition," Lillie Shockney says, "hope is something in the future, something that motivates us to go forward in some manner. When someone is facing cancer, it's important from the outset to learn what that person's life goals and hopes are and to think about whether these hopes can be fulfilled. Are they realistic? Sometimes, you have to step back and take a different path."

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