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A Very Modern (Family) Cancer Campaign

Wednesday, May 20, 2015

This new campaign by Bristol-Myers Squibb and Eric Stonestreet of ABC’s Modern Family gives people the opportunity to “Raise your flag” in support of someone they know who is affected by cancer. In thirty seconds, anyone can create a virtual flag with the name of the person they support and share it on the Ready. Raise. Rise. page, as well as on Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram to let them know they’re not alone.

But that’s not the best part.

Pink, Black and White: The Real Color of Breast Cancer

Wednesday, February 18, 2015

In 2014, the Sinai Urban Health Institute and the Avon Foundation for Women conducted a study of the death rates of white and black women due to breast cancer in 50 of the nation’s largest cities over a period of 20 years. The results were striking:

Though white women are more likely to be diagnosed with breast cancer, on average black women are 40% more likely to die from it.

The most lethal city is Memphis, TN where black women are more than twice as likely to succumb to the disease.

Cities with the highest disparity rates are cities where there are geographically separated medical centers that serve either primarily black or white patients (with little racial mixing).

The mortality rates were relatively even until 1995. After that, white women’s rates declined while black women’s rates stayed the same.

Remember That Cancer is Not "Beyond Us"

Wednesday, February 4, 2015

Today is World Cancer Day, an opportunity to raise awareness of cancer and its impact on local communities all over the globe.

This year’s theme is “Not Beyond Us.” This tagline can be interpreted and applied in a few different ways. One idea that came to my mind is the impact that cancer continues to have even after a person is finished with treatment. Life doesn’t just go back to normal. Cancer survivors are often faced with challenges even after they’ve been declared cancer-free.

What You Need to Know About Lung Cancer Awareness Month

Wednesday, November 19, 2014

November is Lung Cancer Awareness Month. During this month, health care organizations, professionals and the community bring attention to lung cancer. Lung Cancer Awareness Month initially began in 1995 as Lung Cancer Awareness Day. However, as the lung cancer community and movement grew, activities to promote awareness also grew, transforming the day into Lung Cancer Awareness Month.

Shining the Light on MPNs

Wednesday, September 10, 2014

Each year, about 14,500 people are diagnosed with myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPNs), a group of rare blood cancers originating in bone marrow. Tomorrow, September 11, 2014 is recognized as MPN Awareness Day. Living with a rare cancer like an MPN comes with a unique set of challenges that make raising awareness, tomorrow and every day, crucial—so that no one faces cancer alone.

Gray in May – Brain Tumor Awareness

Wednesday, May 21, 2014

A brain tumor diagnosis can trigger a number of emotions, including fear, loneliness, and anger. It is important to remember that you are not alone and there are many resources available to help you. Through these resources, you can take charge of your experience and gain a sense of empowerment.

In recognition of breast cancer awareness month

Wednesday, October 9, 2013

Each year, 1 in 8 U.S. women are diagnosed with breast cancer, and about 1 in 1000 U.S. men are diagnosed. During National Breast Cancer Awareness Month, we want to ensure that everyone touched by cancer knows about all of the programs and services we offer, all free of charge. Additionally, in recognition of this awareness month, the Cancer Support Community is offering both new and ongoing programs and services for those affected specifically by breast cancer.

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