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Health Care Reform: What's Next

Wednesday, September 6, 2017

Efforts to repeal and replace the Affordable Care Act (ACA or “Obamacare) have been unsuccessful thus far. Although the House passed the “American Health Care Act” in May, the Senate did not pass their companion bill, the “Better Care Reconciliation Act.” However, efforts to repeal and replace the ACA are far from over, and CSC is concerned that several mechanisms may undermine the ability of individuals to access comprehensive, high-quality, timely, and affordable health care coverage.

Blog: Cancer Moonshot One Year Later

Wednesday, June 28, 2017

This week the Cancer Support Community, along with six other leading cancer organizations, hosted the Cancer Moonshot: One Year Later, an event continuing the momentum of the Cancer Moonshot Initiative. The initiative works to increase research funding and accelerate cancer discoveries. Researchers, oncologists, care providers, philanthropists, data and tech experts, advocates, patients and survivors all work together toward the Moonshot goal: to make a decade’s worth of advances in cancer prevention, diagnosis, treatment, and care in just five years.

Brain Tumor Awareness Month: Cancer Research and the Bidens

Wednesday, May 3, 2017

In 2013, Beau Biden, former Vice President Joe Biden’s son, was diagnosed with stage 4 glioblastoma. Beau was the attorney general of Delaware and served his country overseas in Iraq. As Joe put it, “Beau Biden was, quite simply, the finest man any of us have ever known.” In May 2015, Beau passed away at the age of 46. Since then, Joe Biden has dedicated his life to making strides in cancer research, diagnosis, treatment, and care.

What Can a Little Cancer Support Lead To?

Wednesday, April 5, 2017

When I was 46-year-old, as a single father of my son Joel, who is 13, I tried to go to a Boy Scout camp that required a medical release form. But my doctor insisted on doing a physical before signing it. Because of this, a life-saving PSA test was given. A PSA of 19 led to a biopsy, which discovered a Gleason score of 9, and I had to tell my son that I had prostate cancer.

American Health Care Act Changes in Advance of Vote

Tuesday, March 21, 2017

Last night (March 20), House Republicans introduced amendments to their health care reform legislation the American Health Care Act. Check out our blog to find out details and sign up to be a grassroots advocate.

President Trump’s Budget Significantly Reduces Funding for Cancer Research

Friday, March 17, 2017

President Trump released his proposed budget, “America First: A Budget Blueprint to Make America Great Again” on Wednesday, March 15. It includes significant funding cuts, including a near 20% reduction to the Department of Health and Human Services and National Institutes of Health including the National Cancer Institute.

Replacing the Affordable Care Act: What You Need to Know

Tuesday, March 7, 2017

The American Health Care Act was introduced in the U.S. House of Representatives on March 6, 2017. As this bill, and other proposals are considered, it is important for cancer patients, survivors, and their loved ones to understand the potential implications of these changes.

A New Era in Cancer Policy

Wednesday, January 18, 2017

Friday is Inauguration Day. Regardless of who you voted for, the beginning of a new administration is a great time to refocus our efforts to ensure that no one faces cancer alone. In addition, there are new elected officials in the Senate, House of Representatives, and in state houses across the country who are empowered to make change on a number of issues. Help us make sure that support for people affected by cancer is on that list.

Act Now: Making a Difference in Cancer Policy

Wednesday, November 9, 2016

This month, we’re continuing our Many Faces of Advocacy campaign by highlighting policy advocacy. Policy advocacy is probably what you first think of when you hear the word “advocacy.” A cancer policy advocate pushes for changes in government that will improve the lives of people affected by cancer. This can come in many forms, from writing a letter to your congressional representatives to spreading the word about important legislation using social media.

Community Advocacy for You

Wednesday, October 26, 2016

Getting involved in your community is one of the most rewarding ways to help people impacted by cancer. That’s why this past month, we’ve been talking about the different possibilities for becoming a community advocate. Let’s recap what we’ve discussed and what we can all do going forward to make sure that no one in our communities faces cancer alone.

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