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10 Tips for Caregivers

Wednesday, November 4, 2015

A cancer diagnosis can impact your whole world. But what happens when you are also a big part of someone else’s world? Cancer impacts not just the person diagnosed, but their whole network of friends, family members and loved ones can feel the effects as well. This is especially true for the person acting as caregiver.

Life After Treatment: Creating a New Normal

Wednesday, August 12, 2015

Once the fight against cancer is won, a new journey begins.

People don’t always talk about life after cancer. The stories and movies tend to focus on the treatment. After treatment is over, the story is over and life appears just to go on. However, this is generally not the case. There can be left over side effects from treatment, both physically and emotionally, as well as questions about the future. How to go back to “normal” may feel impossible–you may not even know where to start.

Cancer changed your life, and just because treatment is over does not mean you have to go back to exactly the way things were. Your “new normal” is how many people describe life after cancer.

Here are some tips to help create your new normal.

Make This a #CSCEmpower-ing Summer

Wednesday, June 24, 2015

How much of a difference can someone make in a month?

That’s the question we’re asking you this July. For one month, CSC will be displaying a banner in a window at Rockefeller Plaza, New York to inform people of the free services CSC offers to people affected by cancer.

The banner reads, “Everyone knows someone touched by cancer. I am a…” to show how no matter where we live or who we are, there is one experience that is universal: we’ve all known someone affected by cancer that has needed support, and we’ve all wanted to help them.

Now, you have the power to make an actual difference in your loved ones’ lives. The more people know about the resources CSC provides, the more we can help ease the physical and emotional toll that cancer takes.

What You Need to Know When You Attend Your First Support Group

Monday, June 15, 2015

Stepping into a group for the first time is both brave and humble. As a new group member, you are coming to hold the feelings and experiences of your group members, while also letting them hold your feelings and story. It’s normal to feel anxiety about what to expect, but people are often surprised at how comfortable they feel even if they never saw themselves as a “support group” kind of person. Hearing the stories of others who get it from the inside out can be a validating and reassuring experience.

#Thankanurse: A Tribute from CSC’s Affiliate Network

Friday, May 29, 2015

Patrice A. Stephens, MSN, APN, ACON-BC, began her work with breast cancer patients at Advocate Christ Medical Center nearly 35 years ago. In her first role as an oncology nurse and her current position as Breast Nurse Navigator, Patrice has touched the lives of tens of thousands of breast cancer patients and their families. Patrice provides extraordinary patient-centered care to the women she meets each day. Her approach to working with breast cancer patients expands beyond medical care. Patrice provides referrals for wigs, prosthesis, social support, counseling, and breast cancer networking groups in order to further assist her patients during their journey with breast cancer. She offers hope during difficult and uncertain times.

Be the Boss Over Cancer

Wednesday, April 8, 2015

Hello! I’m Kelsey Fenton, Associate Manager of Programs at Cancer and Careers, a national non-profit organization that empowers and educates people with cancer to thrive in their workplace, and a long-time partner of CSC.

Upon receiving a cancer diagnosis, you might be overwhelmed not only with treatment decisions, finding support and financial stress (in which CSC provides a number of great resources) but also employment challenges. Whether you are deciding if you should take time off for treatment, are looking for work after treatment or trying to figure out how to manage working through treatment, there is a lot of information that you need to gather – from various sources.

At Cancer and Careers, we provide a variety of programs and information in person, print and online to help you gather such information and navigate the practical and legal challenges of balancing work and cancer.

What I’ve Learned from Watching “Cancer: The Emperor of All Maladies”

Wednesday, April 1, 2015

When I first started watching the PBS documentary Cancer: The Emperor of All Maladies on Monday night I wasn’t sure I agreed with calling cancer an emperor. It seemed to be such a positive and powerful term to place on something with such a negative impact. But after two nights of tuning in and live tweeting, and as I get ready for the third, I get it. Cancer is a disease like no other, even within itself it never seems to be the same way twice—it’s smarter than that. Giving a powerful disease a powerful name pays respect to the millions of people who take on “The Emperor” every year–a respect greatly earned by all who are affected.

But that isn’t the only thing that struck me while watching the first two nights of the film.

3 Things to Know About Oncology Social Work: #31daysofSW

Wednesday, March 25, 2015

Cancer Support Community Helpline counselor Justin Short shares how he copes with the emotional turmoil of the cancer experience and the best part of his job as a counselor.

A Day in the Life: #31daysofSW

Thursday, March 19, 2015

Cancer Support Community Helpline Counselor Charli Prather, MSW, LCSW, answers questions about her career, her work as a helpline counselor and why she loves what she does.

A Day in the Life: #31daysofSW

Wednesday, March 18, 2015

I have been an oncology social worker for 25 years. There are many lessons I have learned but probably the one that has transformed my life is to try to live each day with as much presence in the moment as I can. I admit that this isn’t always easy but the closer I stay to living in the moment, the more I experience the joy of being alive and the less I worry about what’s to come or trying to control what’s beyond my control.

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