Skip to main content
 

Lynch Syndrome and Cancer

Wednesday, March 19, 2014

Up to 5% of colorectal cancers are attributed to an inherited disorder known as Lynch syndrome. A genetic counselor will help you determine if you or other family members should consider genetic testing for Lynch syndrome. This condition increases your risk of getting not just colorectal cancer, but also the other types of cancers.

New CSC Tools Designed to Help People with Metastatic Skin Cancers

Wednesday, February 12, 2014

Of all skin cancer, melanoma is the most likely to become metastatic and, until recently, the picture was fairly grim. But, with several recently approved drugs – the first new treatments in over a decade – it means some people with metastatic melanoma are living longer and better than ever.

Parenting with Cancer

Wednesday, January 29, 2014

Children facing a parent’s diagnosis can often feel out of place, as it may be difficult for them to relate to other children who are not going through the same issues at home. More than 3 million children currently have a parent diagnosed with cancer, and it is important to address their specific emotional needs.

Tips for Staying Healthy During Flu Season

Wednesday, January 8, 2014

Precautions you can take this flu season.

In recognition of breast cancer awareness month

Wednesday, October 9, 2013

Each year, 1 in 8 U.S. women are diagnosed with breast cancer, and about 1 in 1000 U.S. men are diagnosed. During National Breast Cancer Awareness Month, we want to ensure that everyone touched by cancer knows about all of the programs and services we offer, all free of charge. Additionally, in recognition of this awareness month, the Cancer Support Community is offering both new and ongoing programs and services for those affected specifically by breast cancer.

Affordability of Insurance Plans Offered on the Health Insurance Marketplaces

Wednesday, September 11, 2013

As implementation of the health reform law (the Affordable Care Act) continues, individuals that do not have insurance through an employer or government plan like Medicare or Medicaid, will be required to purchase insurance on state-based Health Insurance Marketplaces, or exchanges. Open enrollment begins October 1st for coverage that will begin as early as January 1, 2014.

As we have written about before, one unknown about the plans offered in the Marketplaces has been the out-of-pocket costs to consumers, both for premiums and health care co-pays, deductibles and coinsurance.

August is Health Literacy Month

Wednesday, August 21, 2013

When diagnosed with cancer, you hear many different medical terms. At first these terms seem like alphabet soup or a long-ago algebra problem. Navigating the world of cancer care and its terminology is a daunting task for anyone.

Heath literacy is defined as obtaining, communicating, processing and understanding health information and services to make appropriate health decisions. A person who has trouble finding and utilizing the correct health information that they need has limited health literacy. This is a crucial skill for people to have in order to understand and cope with a cancer diagnosis and their treatment options.

What to do When There’s a Drug Shortage

Wednesday, August 7, 2013

In recent years the number of drugs that are in short supply has been increasing, including drugs used to treat cancer. Most of these shortages are for drugs that are injected, or given intravenously. Some of these shortages are short-term and are caused by problems with shipping and ordering. Sometimes these shortages last longer. This is especially true when the shortage is caused by problems in the manufacturing of the drugs. If you have been diagnosed with cancer and are getting chemotherapy as part of your treatment, it is understandable that you would be concerned about a possible drug shortage.

Making a Decision About Cancer Treatment

Wednesday, July 24, 2013

The good news in recent years is that there are more and more types of treatment for many kinds of cancer. No longer does “one size fit all” when you are making a decision about the type of treatment you’ll receive. More good news is that increasingly people are making these decisions jointly with their health care team as a part of shared decision making.

The challenge is that having to make these complicated treatment decisions can leave people feeling overwhelmed and confused. This is because for many people there is more than one treatment choice, and each of these choices has advantages and disadvantages.

Pages

Authors