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When it’s Time for a Second Opinion

Wednesday, January 6, 2016

Hearing you have cancer can be shocking. And it’s perfectly reasonable to want to take action and begin treatment right away. However, taking your time can have several advantages, including having the opportunity to evaluate options and seek other opinions.

10 Things You Should Do If You are Diagnosed with Cancer

Wednesday, December 16, 2015

This week’s blog post is by Kim Thiboldeaux, CEO of the Cancer Support Community. This blog post also appears this month in the Huffington Post, and you can read more of Kim’s Huffington Post blog posts here.

What President Carter’s Announcement Teaches Us about Immunotherapy

Wednesday, December 9, 2015

This week, President Jimmy Carter announced he has been declared N.E.D (No Evidence of Disease) after undergoing treatment for metastatic melanoma, which was diagnosed in August of this year. President Carter credits this happy announcement to an immunotherapy treatment he received. Immunotherapy is a type of cancer treatment that uses the body’s own immune system to control cancer. Here’s what we know about this exciting new treatment option and how it works.

Help Us Understand the Full Impact of Blood Cancer

Wednesday, September 30, 2015

Because of the widespread impact of blood cancer diagnoses, it’s important to raise awareness, not just during Blood Cancer Awareness Month every September, but all year long. Part of raising awareness of this group of cancers means learning more about the full experience of living with this diagnosis—from physical symptoms to the social, emotional and financial impact.

Raising Awareness of Prostate Cancer

Monday, September 28, 2015

Prostate Cancer Awareness Month is in full swing, and there is a lot to talk about. Prostate cancer is the 2nd most common type of cancer affecting men in the United States and there are more than 2 million survivors of prostate cancer across the country. Moreover, one in seven men will become diagnosed with prostate cancer in their lifetimes. Prostate health affects all men and their loved ones.

What You Need to Know About Ovarian Cancer

Thursday, September 24, 2015

September is Ovarian Cancer Awareness Month, a time to recognize the impact of ovarian cancer, educate others and ourselves about this type of cancer and take action.

What Do I Tell the Kids?

Wednesday, September 23, 2015

“Any emotion is ok. Don’t try to be perfect. Fail a little, prevail a little. Get through it best you can.”

So begins the advice of a parent and lymphoma caregiver. Coping with cancer and being a parent both are challenging tasks in their own respects. Doing both at the same time can be especially difficult, because there is no “one size fits all” way to approach telling your children that you have cancer. How each child reacts to this will depend on their age and their knowledge of cancer, but like living with cancer, there is no “one size fits all” experience.

The Trouble with Accessing Gynecological Cancer Care

Wednesday, July 22, 2015

A new study finds that many women in the United States live more than 50 miles from the nearest doctor specializing in women’s gynecological cancers. This health disparity makes it difficult, if not impossible for some women to have access much needed care.

The study, conducted by the University of Pennsylvania, found that about 36% of the counties in the United States are located more than 50 miles from the nearest doctor that focuses on gynecological cancer. This affects about 15 million women.

A Day in the Life of a CSC Affiliate

Wednesday, July 15, 2015

Today’s blog post is by Diane Robinson, the Program Director of the Cancer Support Community at Orlando Health. This Affiliate is CSC’s second hospital partnership. She answers questions about CSC’s new partnership.

Meeting the Needs of Cancer Survivors

Sunday, June 7, 2015

Today is National Cancer Survivors Day. Cancer survivorship is often thought to begin on the day of diagnosis. While the term “survivor” can have different meanings—one thing is clear—the social and emotional needs of people who have ever had cancer are vast. Whether you’re newly diagnosed, in treatment, facing a recurrence or considered cured, cancer survivors have distinct needs, and these needs can change over time.