Skip to main content
 

Unleash Your Voice!

Thursday, April 30, 2015

Let’s face it. It can be easy to feel disconnected from the government. Sometimes you may feel like your voice isn’t important. But luckily, for the 13.7 million people in the United States impacted by cancer, that’s not the case. Your voice is VERY important! What many Americans don’t realize is that they have the power to not only make their voice heard, but also to be an advocate for people impacted by cancer.

Pink, Black and White: The Real Color of Breast Cancer

Wednesday, February 18, 2015

In 2014, the Sinai Urban Health Institute and the Avon Foundation for Women conducted a study of the death rates of white and black women due to breast cancer in 50 of the nation’s largest cities over a period of 20 years. The results were striking:

Though white women are more likely to be diagnosed with breast cancer, on average black women are 40% more likely to die from it.

The most lethal city is Memphis, TN where black women are more than twice as likely to succumb to the disease.

Cities with the highest disparity rates are cities where there are geographically separated medical centers that serve either primarily black or white patients (with little racial mixing).

The mortality rates were relatively even until 1995. After that, white women’s rates declined while black women’s rates stayed the same.

Understanding the Impact of Cancer on Caregivers

Wednesday, February 11, 2015

Whether you love this holiday or completely despise it, Valentine’s Day is this Saturday. If you’re a person who loves Valentine’s Day, this is a day to celebrate love and companionship. But when your Valentine is living with cancer and you’re acting as the caregiver, this day can take on a deeper and more complex meaning. Caring for a spouse can be extremely challenging. According to the National Quality of Life Survey for Caregivers, a caregiver spends an average of eight hours a day providing care and support to their loved one, and many caregivers feel just as much distress, if not more, than the patient does.

CSC on Capitol Hill

Wednesday, October 8, 2014

Cancer Support Community participated in the September 30th briefings on Capitol Hill to discuss the importance of the protected classes for Medicare beneficiaries facing cancer diagnoses.

Shining the Light on MPNs

Wednesday, September 10, 2014

Each year, about 14,500 people are diagnosed with myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPNs), a group of rare blood cancers originating in bone marrow. Tomorrow, September 11, 2014 is recognized as MPN Awareness Day. Living with a rare cancer like an MPN comes with a unique set of challenges that make raising awareness, tomorrow and every day, crucial—so that no one faces cancer alone.

Americans Left Behind by Health Reform

Wednesday, March 12, 2014

Approximately 5-8 million people in these states will fall into the coverage gap because their incomes are too high to qualify for their state’s Medicaid program, but are below the poverty level and therefore do not qualify for subsidies to buy insurance on the marketplaces.

Administration Preserves Patient Access to Certain Medications

Tuesday, March 11, 2014

On March 6, 2014 the Cancer Policy Institute at the Cancer Support Community (CSC) submitted a letter to the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) raising concerns about how a proposed change in policy could hinder cancer patients’ access to certain types of medication.

Health Insurance Marketplace Opens for Business

Tuesday, October 1, 2013

As we have discussed, today is the day that the Health Insurance Marketplaces open so that consumers can compare plans and shop for affordable insurance coverage. The Marketplaces will make health insurance coverage available to the 48 million Americans who are currently uninsured.

As you have heard in the news, Congress is gridlocked over funding for the government and its activities for the new fiscal year (which also starts today). As a result, the federal government is partially shut down.

Getting Help Through Uncertain Paths

Wednesday, July 31, 2013

I lost my mother to cancer just a month after I turned 24. Following her diagnosis of stage 4 esophageal cancer, she braved through more than two years of aggressive chemotherapy, radiation and surgery.

Losing people you love to cancer is of course tremendous to bear. Ask anyone who has experienced it—what’s said will likely bring you to tears. Stories of dashed hopes, of unanswered prayers, of lost time could shake your faith to the core. They knell of unavoidable pain as well as of our own fragility.

The Lung Cancer Community Speaks Out

Wednesday, July 17, 2013

During a public meeting at the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) last month, a lung cancer survivor shared her experience. When she was diagnosed years ago, the first thing her doctor said to her was, “How should we begin your smoking cessation program?”

The woman had never even been a smoker—just like one out of every five people living with lung cancer.

She then pointed out that even if she had been, 60% of people diagnosed with lung cancer have already quit smoking, and many long-time smokers became addicted when they were just teens—and for many, that was before government warnings and stricter laws on advertising

Pages

Authors