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How Can You Be a Cancer Patient Advocate?

Wednesday, July 26, 2017

Health care policy is often disconnected from patients, especially cancer patients. Medicare and Medicaid policy can impact a family’s ability to afford chemotherapy and have an impact not only on the cancer patient but on the entire family. If the price of cancer medications is so high that people can’t afford to put food on the table, then health care policy is not working for patients.

Insight into the Patient Experience

Friday, July 21, 2017

Earlier this week, the Research and Training Institute at the Cancer Support Community hosted Insight into the Patient Experience, a special program commemorating the release of its second Registry Report based on the findings of the Cancer Experience Registry.

Promoting Better Care for Cancer-Related Problems with Sexuality or Fertility

Wednesday, July 19, 2017

Will2Love’s Bring it up! Cancer, Sex, and Fertility campaign has two goals: to increase the number of discussions patients and professionals have about sexuality and fertility in cancer care and to provide practical tips and tools that enable patients to get the help they need to better manage their problems.

Social Security Disability Benefits and Cancer

Wednesday, July 12, 2017

If you have been diagnosed with cancer, you may be wondering if you’ll qualify for Social Security disability benefits. Unfortunately, the answer may not be a simple yes or no. The Social Security Administration (SSA) has different eligibility criteria for each applicant.

What Patients Say, What Doctors Hear

Wednesday, July 5, 2017

Danielle Ofri is an internist at Bellevue Hospital, an associate professor of medicine at NYU, and editor in chief of the Bellevue Literary Review. Her latest book is What Patients Say, What Doctors Hear. Doctor-patient communication is a two-way highway of information, with each person endeavoring to convey information to the other. But there can be numerous roadblocks and detours, as anyone who has been party to our medical system can attest.

Cancer Moonshot One Year Later

Wednesday, June 28, 2017

This week the Cancer Support Community, along with six other leading cancer organizations, hosted the Cancer Moonshot: One Year Later, an event continuing the momentum of the Cancer Moonshot Initiative. The initiative works to increase research funding and accelerate cancer discoveries. Researchers, oncologists, care providers, philanthropists, data and tech experts, advocates, patients and survivors all work together toward the Moonshot goal: to make a decade’s worth of advances in cancer prevention, diagnosis, treatment, and care in just five years.

PRIDE Month: Health Disparities and Care for LGBT Cancer Patients

Wednesday, June 21, 2017

Every June, LGBTQ+ pride month is celebrated with parades and marches across the country.Studies have shown that the LGBTQ+ community has a higher risk of being diagnosed with certain cancers than non-LGBTQ people. Education around being LGBTQ+ and a cancer patient is growing to support the LGBTQ+ cancer community.

Discussing Men’s Health Week

Wednesday, June 14, 2017

International Men’s Health Week is celebrated from June 12 to June 18 (Father’s Day!). This week is used to raise awareness of preventable health problems in both men and boys and encourage early detection and treatment of disease.

A Night with Marin Mazzie and Jason Danieley

Monday, June 12, 2017

On May 31st, I had the absolute pleasure of watching Marin Mazzie sing these words during “Broadway & Beyond,” a night of powerhouse musical performances by Mazzie and her husband Jason Danieley.

New Research Presented by CSC at ASCO 2017

Thursday, June 8, 2017

The Cancer Support Community was honored to return to ASCO and we did not come empty-handed. Armed with three abstracts and one poster presentation, CSC’s Research and Training Institute (RTI) team was ready to share our research with the oncology community. Through the Cancer Experience Registry®, the RTI has collected data from over 11,000 cancer patients and caregivers—with every type of cancer represented.

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