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Becoming a Community Advocate

Wednesday, October 5, 2016

This month at the Cancer Support Community, we’re highlighting community advocacy as one of the best ways to build relationships, create dialogues and increase understanding for those affected by cancer. You can become a community advocate whether you have had cancer or have been a caregiver or loved one to someone living with cancer.

The Many Faces of Advocacy

Wednesday, August 31, 2016

Each year, as summer turns into fall, the cancer community begins a period of awareness, as many cancer awareness months and observances occur in September, October and November. Here at the Cancer Support Community, we wanted to use this opportunity to bring awareness to the importance of advocacy for everyone touched by cancer. That’s why we’re launching our Many Faces of Advocacy campaign. Over the next three months, we will try to demystify advocacy and explain all the different ways anyone can be a cancer advocate.

Creating Hope Through Clinical Trials: A Q&A with Dr. Patricia Robinson

Wednesday, July 13, 2016

This week's blog post is an excerpt from last month's Cancer Experience Registry newsletter. This excerpt is from a Q&A with Dr. Patricia Robinson, Associate Professor of Hematology/Oncology at Loyola University Hospital, on the importance of cancer clinical trials.

Cancer and Aging: The Connection Between Two Life-Changing Events

Wednesday, June 15, 2016

This week's blog post is an excerpt from last month's Cancer Experience Registry newsletter. This excerpt is from an interview with Jimmie Holland, MD, Wayne E. Chapmen Chair of Psychiatric Oncology at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, and Dayle Friedman, Rabbi, Spiritual Consultant and Trainer at Growing Older: Wisdom + Spirit Beyond Midlife. This newsletter focused on the topic of cancer and aging.

The Golden State Speaks: A Story of Attending 2016’s Breakaway from Cancer

Wednesday, May 25, 2016

Last week, I traveled to Breakaway from Cancer, a collaboration between Amgen and four non-profit organizations, including the Cancer Support Community, to provide resources about cancer through an eight-day Lifestyle Festival throughout cities in California.

Hope: What Motivates Us to Go Forward

Wednesday, May 11, 2016

"By definition," Lillie Shockney says, "hope is something in the future, something that motivates us to go forward in some manner. When someone is facing cancer, it's important from the outset to learn what that person's life goals and hopes are and to think about whether these hopes can be fulfilled. Are they realistic? Sometimes, you have to step back and take a different path."

The Caregiver's Perspective

Thursday, March 3, 2016

This week’s blog post is from the Cancer Experience Registry February newsletter. This newsletter focused on the cancer experience from the caregiver’s perspective.

Working to Understand the Full Impact of Stomach Cancer

Thursday, February 4, 2016

The Advisory Board grew silent as one of the caregivers told his story. It was the first meeting of the group the Cancer Support Community brought together to plan the new Stomach Cancer program for the Cancer Experience Registry.

He was young, nice looking, straight forward--but the pain and futility of his beautiful wife’s illness and death from stomach cancer was clear as he spoke. The doctors in the group listened and stressed the urgent need for new therapies to improve the prognosis, but we all came away from that meeting with a deeply increased understanding of the importance of connecting to the community of people impacted by stomach cancer (also known as gastric cancer) -- and giving them a voice.

Elevating the Patient Voice: 3 Things We Learned from Cancer Experience Registry Data

Wednesday, October 22, 2014

Today, the Cancer Support Community is excited to announce that the index report of these findings, Elevating the Patient Voice, is now available online!

A Hidden Battle in the Cancer Journey

Wednesday, September 24, 2014

Researchers recommend a new, nurse-led approach to treating depression. This approach combined anti-depressant drugs, problem-solving therapy and encouragement towards physical activity. In a study of 500 patients, this approach led to over 60 percent of participants reporting their depression scores as half of the previous score. Participants also said that they felt less anxiety, fatigue, and pain. Researchers argued that similar programs could vastly improve the quality of life of many individuals diagnosed with cancer.