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Kim Thiboldeaux joined The Wellness Community in 2000 as President and CEO. In 2009, the headquarters offices of The Wellness Community and Gilda’s Club joined forces to become the Cancer Support Community, one of the largest providers of social and emotional support worldwide, where Kim has maintained her role as CEO. The combined organization is the largest nonprofit employer of psychosocial oncology mental health professionals in North America, advancing the idea that psychosocial care is as important as medical care in the face of a cancer diagnosis. The Cancer Support Community provides social and emotional support through a network of more than 50 local affiliates, more than 100 satellite locations and online at www.cancersupportcommunity.org. The organization also maintains a Research & Training Institute in Philadelphia and a Cancer Policy Institute in Washington, D.C.

10 Things You Should Do If You are Diagnosed with Cancer

Wednesday, December 16, 2015

This week’s blog post is by Kim Thiboldeaux, CEO of the Cancer Support Community. This blog post also appears this month in the Huffington Post, and you can read more of Kim’s Huffington Post blog posts here.

Do Awareness Months Work?

Wednesday, October 28, 2015

Recently, a friend confessed to experiencing cancer awareness month fatigue. For weeks now, her Facebook news feed and Twitter updates were filled with one cancer reminder after the other. She felt completely overwhelmed by the sheer quantity of cancers and bombarded by the amount of related information. Given my field of work, she felt guilty about even raising the issue, but she felt compelled to ask me: “Tell me the truth, Kim. Does it make a difference? Does it actually help?”

How Do Patients Define Value in Cancer Care?

Wednesday, August 19, 2015

In a time when the price tag on health care continues to rise, and more of the cost burden is being shifted to patients, there is a crucial conversation taking place in the cancer world about how value is defined. It led us at the Cancer Support Community to ask – do patients define value the same way as the health care system? And we sought to get answers by first asking the experts- the patients themselves- a single question: “When considering your cancer experience, how do you define value?” Thousands answered by participating in our Cancer Experience Registry, a panel of cancer patients. The data was so compelling that we launched additional registries for specific cancers, starting with metastatic breast cancer “mbc”. While there are some consistent themes across the various diagnoses, people with different kinds of cancer have issues that are more specific, or even unique to their diseases. At the same time, we researched traditional definitions of value in health care so that we could compare them with the definitions put forward by people with mbc. The disconnect between the two was staggering – but maybe not surprising.