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Every Day is a Gift: The Importance of Living in the Present

Thursday, October 22, 2015

After a diagnosis there can be many changes in patterns of thinking, planning and your overall life plan. To quote Regina Brett, a New York Times bestselling author and breast cancer survivor, “When you hear the word cancer, it’s as if someone took the game of Life and tossed it in the air. All the pieces go flying. The pieces land on a new board. Everything has shifted. You don’t know where to start.” It can be easy to slip into a pattern of worry—worrying about family, worrying about friends and worrying about the future. It is also completely normal to begin to question your existence and your life path.

What Do I Tell the Kids?

Wednesday, September 23, 2015

“Any emotion is ok. Don’t try to be perfect. Fail a little, prevail a little. Get through it best you can.”

So begins the advice of a parent and lymphoma caregiver. Coping with cancer and being a parent both are challenging tasks in their own respects. Doing both at the same time can be especially difficult, because there is no “one size fits all” way to approach telling your children that you have cancer. How each child reacts to this will depend on their age and their knowledge of cancer, but like living with cancer, there is no “one size fits all” experience.