Skip to main content
 

The Benefits of Exercise During Treatment

Wednesday, August 5, 2015

Even though exercising may feel impossible during treatment, it is extremely important and may help with long term recovery. When you are newly diagnosed, so many other things related to health tend to take priority. But, over the years a growing number of studies show that exercising is greatly beneficial to your treatment and long term care.

One of the best reasons to work out during treatment is that it has been proven to reduce fatigue. Patients that exercise during treatment actually experience 40-50% less fatigue according to this study from the National Comprehensive Cancer Network.

Greetings from the CSC Staff Retreat

Thursday, July 30, 2015

It takes a team to ensure that no one faces cancer alone, and with an estimated 1.6 million people diagnosed with cancer every year, we’re glad to have a great team assembled here at CSC.

The Trouble with Accessing Gynecological Cancer Care

Wednesday, July 22, 2015

A new study finds that many women in the United States live more than 50 miles from the nearest doctor specializing in women’s gynecological cancers. This health disparity makes it difficult, if not impossible for some women to have access much needed care.

The study, conducted by the University of Pennsylvania, found that about 36% of the counties in the United States are located more than 50 miles from the nearest doctor that focuses on gynecological cancer. This affects about 15 million women.

A Day in the Life of a CSC Affiliate

Wednesday, July 15, 2015

Today’s blog post is by Diane Robinson, the Program Director of the Cancer Support Community at Orlando Health. This Affiliate is CSC’s second hospital partnership. She answers questions about CSC’s new partnership.

The Challenge Behind ASCO’s “Value Framework”: The Value of a Drug or the Value of a Life?

Wednesday, July 8, 2015

This week’s guest blog is by Meghan Rodgers. This is Meghan’s story on life with her fiancé Dan Waeger and his journey with cancer. Dan founded the National Collegiate Cancer Foundation (NCCF), an organization that provides financial support to young adults who are impacted by cancer and pursuing higher education.

How the Declaration of Independence Applies to Living with Cancer

Thursday, July 2, 2015

“Now I am face to face with dying. It is up to me now to choose how to live out the months that remain to me.”

These words came from Oliver Sacks, the renowned professor, neurologist, author, amateur chemist and now ocular melanoma patient who recently was told his cancer could not be stopped. And Oliver Sacks is right—everyone living with terminal cancer has a choice about how to live through their disease. And if it were me, I’d live with the immortal words of Thomas Jefferson in mind.

Life, liberty and the pursuit of happiness are three qualities guaranteed to every American by the Declaration of Independence, and nothing—not the government, not a disease and certainly not a prognosis—can take those qualities away from you.

What You Need to Know About the King v. Burwell Decision

Thursday, June 25, 2015

The Cancer Support Community applauds the decision issued by the Supreme Court today, which ensures that millions of Americans will not lose access to their health care coverage. In its decision, the court ruled against the challengers in King v. Burwell, a landmark case that would have had a devastating impact on millions of people who receive health care coverage under the Affordable Care Act (ACA).

King v. Burwell called into question a small phrase in the ACA which says that subsidies will be made available to people buying health insurance on the state-established exchanges, or marketplaces. The plaintiffs in the case argued that this phrase should not apply to people purchasing insurance on the federal exchange–which is currently used by 34 states and more than 7.5 million people.

Make This a #CSCEmpower-ing Summer

Wednesday, June 24, 2015

How much of a difference can someone make in a month?

That’s the question we’re asking you this July. For one month, CSC will be displaying a banner in a window at Rockefeller Plaza, New York to inform people of the free services CSC offers to people affected by cancer.

The banner reads, “Everyone knows someone touched by cancer. I am a…” to show how no matter where we live or who we are, there is one experience that is universal: we’ve all known someone affected by cancer that has needed support, and we’ve all wanted to help them.

Now, you have the power to make an actual difference in your loved ones’ lives. The more people know about the resources CSC provides, the more we can help ease the physical and emotional toll that cancer takes.

What You Need to Know When You Attend Your First Support Group

Monday, June 15, 2015

Stepping into a group for the first time is both brave and humble. As a new group member, you are coming to hold the feelings and experiences of your group members, while also letting them hold your feelings and story. It’s normal to feel anxiety about what to expect, but people are often surprised at how comfortable they feel even if they never saw themselves as a “support group” kind of person. Hearing the stories of others who get it from the inside out can be a validating and reassuring experience.

Big Boys Don't Cry Over Skinned Knees

Wednesday, June 10, 2015

June is National Men’s Health Month, and it’s a great time to raise awareness for men’s self-care and support. The leading causes of death for men in America are heart disease and cancer. Lung cancer and skin cancer are the leading causes of cancer related deaths in America. Often because of the way men are raised, it can be easy to miss opportunities to prevent or diagnose these cancers due to societal pressure on men to endure pain and hardship rather than ask for help.

Pages