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My Experience with Interactive Cancer Care

Thursday, October 15, 2015

In 1998 at 24 years old, I was diagnosed with a brain tumor. Since then, I’ve had three awake brain surgeries, radiation, chemotherapy and clinical trials.

Through my healing journey, as I searched to acquire support, I found I was only scratching the surface in my new cancer world. As I explored to find new resources—in time—clarity emerged. I could not just focus on the disease and instead had to include the whole person.

Taking Charge of Scars: Emerging Art of Mastectomy Tattoos

Wednesday, October 7, 2015

After being diagnosed with breast cancer, millions of women are faced with the tough decision of undergoing a mastectomy or lumpectomy, in addition to other forms of treatment like chemotherapy or radiation therapy. Following these surgeries, which leave women with scars or no breasts at all, there is the option of having reconstructive surgery or leaving the scars as they are. Non-profits like P.Ink want to give women another option—tattoos. While tattooing over surgical scars is not a practice unique to P.Ink and can be requested at any tattoo parlor, P.Ink is one of the only nonprofits in the country that provides women with creative and self-expressive ways to transform their scars.

Help Us Understand the Full Impact of Blood Cancer

Wednesday, September 30, 2015

Because of the widespread impact of blood cancer diagnoses, it’s important to raise awareness, not just during Blood Cancer Awareness Month every September, but all year long. Part of raising awareness of this group of cancers means learning more about the full experience of living with this diagnosis—from physical symptoms to the social, emotional and financial impact.

When Your Child Gets Cancer: A Parent’s Perspective

Tuesday, September 29, 2015

September is Childhood Cancer Awareness Month. For parents with children who have cancer, this is a time to advocate for their children. Each year approximately 15,700 children are diagnosed with cancer. Despite these statistics, childhood cancers do not receive as much funding as adult cancers and the causes of childhood cancer are still unknown.

With the help of two parents and bloggers, Lara and Ken, whose children faced cancer, here is what you need to know about childhood cancer.

Raising Awareness of Prostate Cancer

Monday, September 28, 2015

Prostate Cancer Awareness Month is in full swing, and there is a lot to talk about. Prostate cancer is the 2nd most common type of cancer affecting men in the United States and there are more than 2 million survivors of prostate cancer across the country. Moreover, one in seven men will become diagnosed with prostate cancer in their lifetimes. Prostate health affects all men and their loved ones.

What You Need to Know About Ovarian Cancer

Thursday, September 24, 2015

September is Ovarian Cancer Awareness Month, a time to recognize the impact of ovarian cancer, educate others and ourselves about this type of cancer and take action.

What Do I Tell the Kids?

Wednesday, September 23, 2015

“Any emotion is ok. Don’t try to be perfect. Fail a little, prevail a little. Get through it best you can.”

So begins the advice of a parent and lymphoma caregiver. Coping with cancer and being a parent both are challenging tasks in their own respects. Doing both at the same time can be especially difficult, because there is no “one size fits all” way to approach telling your children that you have cancer. How each child reacts to this will depend on their age and their knowledge of cancer, but like living with cancer, there is no “one size fits all” experience.

How to Help CSC in 30 Seconds or Less

Wednesday, August 26, 2015

What if a 30 second action could raise thousands of dollars, and then those dollars helped provide millions of people touched by cancer as well as their families with high-quality social and emotional support? It sounds too good to be true, right? It’s not. In fact, you can do that right now and until next Tuesday!

So what are we asking, exactly? Help us finish strong in the last week of Ready. Raise. Rise., a national competition sponsored by Bristol-Myers Squibb to raise awareness of cancer advocacy organizations.

How Do Patients Define Value in Cancer Care?

Wednesday, August 19, 2015

In a time when the price tag on health care continues to rise, and more of the cost burden is being shifted to patients, there is a crucial conversation taking place in the cancer world about how value is defined. It led us at the Cancer Support Community to ask – do patients define value the same way as the health care system? And we sought to get answers by first asking the experts- the patients themselves- a single question: “When considering your cancer experience, how do you define value?” Thousands answered by participating in our Cancer Experience Registry, a panel of cancer patients. The data was so compelling that we launched additional registries for specific cancers, starting with metastatic breast cancer “mbc”. While there are some consistent themes across the various diagnoses, people with different kinds of cancer have issues that are more specific, or even unique to their diseases. At the same time, we researched traditional definitions of value in health care so that we could compare them with the definitions put forward by people with mbc. The disconnect between the two was staggering – but maybe not surprising.

Life After Treatment: Creating a New Normal

Wednesday, August 12, 2015

Once the fight against cancer is won, a new journey begins.

People don’t always talk about life after cancer. The stories and movies tend to focus on the treatment. After treatment is over, the story is over and life appears just to go on. However, this is generally not the case. There can be left over side effects from treatment, both physically and emotionally, as well as questions about the future. How to go back to “normal” may feel impossible–you may not even know where to start.

Cancer changed your life, and just because treatment is over does not mean you have to go back to exactly the way things were. Your “new normal” is how many people describe life after cancer.

Here are some tips to help create your new normal.

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